Eczema During Pregnancy – Will It Go Away After The Baby Is Born?

As you probably know, during pregnancy your hormones go a bit haywire and some women develop different symptoms or conditions that they otherwise normally wouldn’t have, so what happens if you develop eczema during pregnancy – will you have it forever after, or will it go away after the baby is born?

The good news is that in most cases it isn’t true eczema, but rather just really dry itchy skin. It often develops around the 2nd trimester and can continue up until a few months after the baby has been born.

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Have Seborrheic Eczema? Here’s How to Treat It

If you have Seborrheic Eczema then you’ve probably tried many different types of treatments, and while some of them may have worked short term nothing that you’ve used has really helped get rid of it completely.

Well the bad news is that not a lot will work effectively and many sufferers have mixed results from both prescribed and store bought remedies. But you probably already knew that having tried numerous creams, treatments and so called solutions over the years.

That’s why people find that even professional dermatologists can’t always help since what works for one patient might not work for the next one making prescribing something quite hit and miss. Continue reading

Is your Baby’s Red Face Eczema?

This baby has eczema all over her face. If she has it on her face and not on her body - it could indicate an allergy to food.

If your baby has a red rash or red marks on her face, then you might be thinking that it is eczema and how you can treat it. Eczema which is also called atopic dermatitis can show up on your baby’s face, particular on the cheeks, forehead or scalp, but can also appear on other parts of the body.

It is intensely itchy and often looks flaky and scaly. It can also sometimes ooze and blister which you will need to treat very gently and carefully so that it doesn’t get infected.

So how can you treat it?

Most recently, a study that was published in Pediatrics in May 2009 found that placing ½ cup bleach into a full bath was five times more effective at treating eczema than plain water. Make sure that the bleach is well mixed into the water first so that it is diluted and won’t harm rather than help your baby’s skin.

It is thought to work as the bleach acts both as an antibiotic clearing up any bacteria on the skin, and also helps condition and help damaged cells.

Does breastfeeding help?

It has long been thought that breastfeeding might help lower the incidence of eczema and other hereditary allergies by building your child’s immune system but this is actually not the cause.

A recent study published in the Pediatric Allergy and Immunology journal on June 21, 2010 reported that of over 20,000 families that took part in the ongoing study those that were breastfed actually INCREASED their chances of getting eczema by the age of 18 months by 12%.

The study also focused on whether the introduction of solid foods helped or hindered whether the child would get eczema, and it was shown that there was no evidence on whether the child would get eczema if you delayed solids or not.

So while it was previously thought that exclusively breastfeeding and delaying solids before 6 months might help reduce atopic dermatitis, it has actually shown to be the opposite.

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Baby Eczema Symptoms

Psoriasis Symptoms in Babies

Skin conditions affect babies just as much as adults, and if your child is showing a rash on their body you might be wondering what it is and whether it is eczema or psoriasis. Psoriasis is actually not that common in babies as it more appears in the teen to young adult stages of life but it is still possible that your baby might have it.

The two most common types of psoriasis in children is plaque psoriasis which looks like a raised red sore that has a flaky silver white centre and shows up usually in folds of skin like elbows and knees (although can be also found on the scalp), or guttate psoriasis that is much smaller and usually appears on arms and legs.

Is it Psoriasis or Eczema?

Many people often misdiagnose their baby’s rash thinking that it may be psoriasis when in actuality it’s eczema, cradle cap, ringworm or diaper rash so it’s important to get your doctor or paediatrician to diagnose the symptoms correctly.

Psoriasis often looks worse than eczema as it is rougher and scalier. It is often much redder as well, while eczema is usually more pink.

Both can be incredibly itchy and if scratched can crack and bleed.

Why Do People Get It?

While there isn’t any clinical evidence to suggest why one child would get it and another wouldn’t, it is though that most symptoms first appear after some sort of trauma to the skin such as a scratch, cut or insect bite.

Unlike eczema, psoriasis isn’t thought to be hereditary.

Treating Psoriasis

If it is psoriasis, your doctor will usually prescribe a steroid cream to help clear it up and also possibly an oral antibiotic to clear up any bacterial infection present.

There are also things that you can do at home to help your child. Adding oils to the bathwater can be a good way to moisturise the skin, as well as using a gentle and fragrance free body moisturiser. The ones marketed to eczema in babies are good options to use.

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Eczema Symptoms in Babies

How to Get Rid Of Eczema on Your Face

Eczema is a horrible condition for anyone who suffers it, but it’s even more heartbreaking when it appears on your face since it is such a prominent place. So if you or someone that is close to you suffers from eczema on their face I’ll go over some of the ways that you can get rid of it.

Now I’m going to assume that you’ve already been to skin specialists and dermatologists for treatment options but they haven’t worked. And by the way if you haven’t seen a skin doctor yet, then I suggest that as a first step.

As you already know, eczema is a type of dermatitis. And since any dermatitis that affects the scalp and face is called seborrhea and looks like crusty blisters that can be weepy or dry we can deal with the condition much easier knowing what we are dealing with.

The first step is take a good vitamin supplement to nourish your skin from within. Most eczema sufferers are often deficient in Vitamin B so you should start there with a Vitamin B complex. This will aid in the healing of all cells and it has all the essential vitamins that you need for healthy skin.

However most Vitamin B supplements often don’t include enough of two particular B Vitamins that are needed for healthy skin and they are B6 and B12. Taking extra Vitamin B6 can really help clear up eczema and other skin conditions since since a deficiency in this vitamin has been linked to skin disorders and allergies. Vitamin B12 is also important as it aids in cell formation and regeneration which you want when you are dealing with rashes and other skin problems.

Another great supplement that helps with eczema on your face (or anywhere on the body really) is Biotin since there has been strong links with a deficiency in Biotin and dermatitis. Biotin is actually Vitamin B7 although it is very rarely called that.

In addition to healing your eczema from the inside, you can also make your own creams and lotions for the outside with natural products as well. If you want to make a good healing cream for your face then making a paste of honey, vitamin E oil and goldenseal root powder has been known to holistically clear up eczema and relieve any itching.

All of these supplements and ingredients can be found at your local grocery store or health food store and are natural and inexpensive. They can help get rid of eczema on your face.